and

greener  
more livable

 

Making European cities

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Green Cities Europe

Everyone probably agrees that urbanization and sustainability are two of the hottest topics of the last decade(s). People move from the countryside towards the cities, which often leads to challenges in terms of housing and quality of life within these places in general. This ‘livability’ is frequently (partially) determined by how ‘green’ a neighborhood is and the proximity of larger parks or a forest.

 



To see what these cities exactly do (and how they do it), we reached out to the foundation behind this movement and a couple of representatives within Europe that are proud to talk about this platform and their initiatives and future.

 

Cities in Europe are focussing more and more on being green. Meaning: literally ‘green’, by adding plants and trees to the streets. There’s an easy explanation for this, as the amount of green becomes more important when a population is growing; public green spaces have a positive impact on the biodiversity and livability within these cities. Therefore, the platform Green Cities (for a Sustainable Europe) was founded, to encourage green in public spaces.

 

Budapest

Warsaw

Aarhus

Grenoble

Leeuwarden

iVerde 'Green Cities/ENA' 

The initiative is supported by the European Union and focuses on several themes: health, climate, the economy, biodiversity and social cohesion.

iVerde 'Green Cities/ENA' 

Leeuwarden

Grenoble

Budapest

Warsaw

Aarhus

This Green Cities campaign runs in thirteen cities throughout Europe. Its main focus is to keep looking for (new) solutions to encourage the greening of public spaces within these cities, by providing innovative ideas, with information based on scientific research and technical expertise. Of course, it is no rocket science that having trees and plants around us makes us happier and healthier, but greening cities also has a positive effect on the biodiversity and the property value in a neighborhood.

 

The initiative is supported by the European Union and focuses on several themes: health, climate, the economy, biodiversity and social cohesion. In the Netherlands, Green Cities was first coined in 2002, at the Floriade Expo, when the philosophy was introduced. This was the first time people were specifically made aware of the added value of greening our surroundings. Now, twenty years later, it’s not just about the appearance, but about the influence on for example productivity and our mental health as well. This is one of the reasons Brussels (EU) supports the Green Cities campaign financially, so their knowledge can be shared.

Everyone probably agrees that urbanization and sustainability are two of the hottest topics of the last decade(s). People move from the countryside towards the cities, which often leads to challenges in terms of housing and quality of life within these places in general. This ‘livability’ is frequently (partially) determined by how ‘green’ a neighborhood is and the proximity of larger parks or a forest.

 


Green Cities Europe


To see what these cities exactly do (and how they do it), we reached out to the foundation behind this movement and a couple of representatives within Europe that are proud to talk about this platform and their initiatives and future.

 

Cities in Europe are focussing more and more on being green. Meaning: literally ‘green’, by adding plants and trees to the streets. There’s an easy explanation for this, as the amount of green becomes more important when a population is growing; public green spaces have a positive impact on the biodiversity and livability within these cities. Therefore, the platform Green Cities (for a Sustainable Europe) was founded, to encourage green in public spaces.

 

iVerde 'Green Cities/ENA' 

Making European cities

and

greener      more livable